Tuesday, March 19, 2013

"If you turn a left-handed glove inside out, it fits..."

This blog exists solely for the purpose of illustrating what happens when you turn a left-handed glove inside-out.  Here are a few pictures.
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To begin with, above is a pair of gloves.  On the left is the left-handed glove.

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Now, the left-handed glove has been inverted.  Luckily for us, there is a tear in the palm of the glove just below the pinky finger, which you can use to compare these images and follow what has gone where during the inversion.




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For comparison, the inverted glove has been rolled over.  The tear is not visible, which illustrates an important point.  A glove that has "handedness" has a distinct palm side and a distinct backhand side.  Common single-use rubber gloves which are used for example in clinical, laboratory, and food-prep settings are not like the gloves shown above: they fit either hand, and if they are inverted they still fit either hand.  Such gloves are not chiral.  That is, they are neither right- nor left-handed gloves.

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I hope this has been illustrative.


4 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Dude thanks for making me look smarter on OkCupid!

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  2. Just had to perform this chirality operation in the kitchen, but with purple gloves. Right ones get sharp cuts, am left (ha!) with extra left ones. Not anymore. Although having the fabric surface on the outside results in some unusual glove sensations.

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